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800 De La Vina St.

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Designation Status: Structure of Merit

Assessor Parcel Number: 037-042-026

Historic Name: Home Furnace & Plumbing Co.

Constructed: 1890

Property Description:

Property Description: Two-story commercial building in the Queen Anne style. This building has a flat roof. Decorative brackets and dentils line the cornice. Dentils line the window headers as well. The exterior wall is comprised primarily of patterned shingles on the second floor. A protruding circular bay window on the second story embodies unique curved glass in the double hung one-over-one windows. The first floor has been altered with vertical boards, new corner entrance, and new, large horizontal, fixed windows. There is a two story balcony on the north elevation with wood posts and double hung windows.

Architect: unknown

Architectural Style: Queen Anne

Property Type: Commercial

Original Use: Grocery store/residence

Significance:

Significance: On June 26, 2019, the Historic Landmarks Commission designated the building a Structure of Merit under the following criteria provided by the Municipal Code, Section 22.22.040.
Criterion D. Its exemplification of a particular architectural style or way of life important to the City, the State, or the Nation:
The building exemplifies the Queen Anne style. Few styles of architecture allow for the exuberant level of detail found in the Queen Anne style. The culmination of Victorian taste, this style shows the eclectic range found in the new era and the ability for manufacturers of the time to distribute these details throughout the country. Thanks to these factors, a variety of ornate columns, spindle work, and elaborate shingles adorn Queen Anne houses.
Queen Anne architecture was born in the later part of the Victorian era which included Gothic Revival, Italianate, Stick, and Second Empire styles. In the 1870s, in England, architect Richard Norman Shaw introduced the Queen Anne residential design. It was intended to evoke domestic architecture of some 200 years earlier. The British public loved it. In the United States, our own first centennial was then approaching and at the huge Philadelphia Centennial Exhibit in 1876, two model houses were built in the Queen Anne style. Americans immediately took to the style. Massively popular in America, Queen Anne spread across the nation at a rapid pace. Much of its success was due to its affordable wood construction (as opposed to the stone and brick of its contemporary, the Romanesque style), as well as its adaptability. Although it had little to do with its name-sake Anne of Great Britain (1665-1714), Queen Anne architecture did look to the past. Whether it was ancient Rome with its swags, garlands, and high-classical columns, or its richly patterned walls of the earlier High Victorian Gothic, Queen Anne combined a wide variety of architecture features into one decorative whole.

Criterion G. Its embodiment of elements demonstrating outstanding attention to architectural design, detail, materials and craftsmanship:
Only the second floor of the building retains its Queen Anne style character-defining features. The following features demonstrate outstanding attention to detail and materials:
Cornice and Eave Details: The expressive cornice is adorned with brackets and dentils.
Windows: The curved bay with unique curved glass windows are double-hung wood, one-over-one panes.
Wall Materials: Elaborate wood shingle patterns adorn the walls of the 2nd floor.

Historic Integrity: The building’s entire bottom floor has been remodeled and does not convey its original appearance. The vertical board siding and fixed glass storefront windows are not appropriate alterations for the building. However, the second floor of the building retains most its original features and has historic integrity of location, feeling, setting, design, materials, workmanship and association. However, because of the alterations on the first floor, the building does not convey its original appearance.

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Documents:

Download Department of Parks and Recreation Form