◀ Back

700 E Anapamu St

Thumb 08202014 101 Thumb 08202014 100 Thumb 08202014 099

Designation Status: Designated City Landmark

Assessor Parcel Number: 029-240-008

Historic Name: Santa Barbara High School Main Building

Constructed: 1924, 1937

Property Description:

Constructed in 1924, the main building has a central block, two-stories in height, with symmetrically placed one-story wings, in the classical Palladian tradition. The style is Spanish Eclectic, a freer expression of the Spanish Colonial Revial style found throughout Santa Barbara. David Gebhard described the building as having an "ulta-Baroque façade with polychromed terra-cotta decoration". Highly ornate terra-cotta work is used sparingly in the areas where it provides the most visual impact, mainly around entrances. Stabilization pins are noticeable on the terra-cotta panels, but do not detract from the effort of the overall design. These pins are necessary to assure that the terra-cotta work does not fall off the building during an earthquake.

The walls are covered in white stucco and the building's roof is comprised of a complex series of hips and gables, covered with red tile. The major departure from the Spanish Colonial Revival style on this building is the large amount of glazing. Spanish Colonial Revival buildings usually feature walls with large blank areas, to simulate adobe construction, which required a lot of structural mass. This large window area was necessary because of the need to bring a lot of natural light into the classrooms. The windows, some of which feature terra-cotta surrounds with iron balconies, are multi-light awning type set in wood frames. Classroom windows are in groups of three and four with wood spindle muntin bars between the individual windows; a detail frequently found in Spanish Eclectic architecture. The school campus has had numerous alterations, but the quality of the architecture of the main building is still prominent.

The development of the campus has been an ongoing process since the opening of the school in 1924. Peabody Stadium was completed late in that same year. In 1927, a shop building was constructed on the Canon Perdido side of the campus housing machine, auto, and wood shop classes. New semi-attached wings were added at the rear of the building in 1939 and 1940 to accommodate the ever growing student population, which had then grown to over seventeen hundred. The Figueroa Street ticket booth was constructed in 1934 by Antonio Da Ros. The field house was completed in early 1941. A gymnasium was opened in 1950 and the swimming pool was completed in the spring of 1951. A decade later, a classroom complex, focusing on the arts, was constructed to the south of the main building. In 1963, a cafeteria and an instrumental music room were added to the campus. In the same year at the other end of the campus, the library was constructed. In the early 1970s, the building was retrofit to meet earthquake standards, a new two-story building was built on Canon Perdido Street, and the auditorium was remodeled. Also during this decade, two fire escape stairways were added to the main façade of the building. Most recently, the school went through a $3.1 million upgrade of handicapped accessible facilities, including the addition of wheelchair accessible ramps and elevators. Despite all of these alterations, the main building retains enough architectural integrity to be easily recognizable by past alumni.

The Figueroa Street Ticket Booth has remained virtually unchanged, and therefore retains its full degree of architectural integrity. The Figueroa Street Ticket Booth at the intersection of Figueroa and Rinconada Road is a six-sided one-story stone building that is an integral part of the retaining wall system behind the stadium. The booth was added in 1934 to provide access to Peabody Stadium, which was completed a decade earlier in 1924. "Arrow Shirt" millionaire and Board of Education President, Frederick Forrest Peabody, donated one hundred thousand dollars to build a "state of the art" stadium for the community. The stands were constructed of concrete at a time when everyone else had wooden bleachers.

Built by stone masons Antonio Da Ros, Lorenzo Dall 'Armi, and Albert Arata, the ticket booth features ashlar-style stonework and a mission barrel tile roof. The stone came from the City quarry in Cold Springs. The quality of the stonework on the booth match that found on large estates of the Riviera, which overlooks the school campus.

Architect: (main building) William H. Weeks, Sauter & Lockard

Architectural Style: Spanish Eclectic

Property Type: Institutional

Original Use: High School

Significance:

Designated City of Santa Barbara Landmark (11/08/2005).

City Council Findings:
A. Its character, interest and value as a significant part of the heritage of the City, the State, or the Nation;
D. Its exemplification a particular architectural style and way of life important to the City, the State, or the Nation;
E. Its exemplification of the best remaining architectural type in a neighborhood.
F. Its identification as the creation, design, or work of a person or persons whose effort significantly influenced the heritage of the City, the State, or the Nation;
G. Its embodiment of elements demonstrating outstanding attention to architectural design, detail, materials and craftmanship;
I. Its unique location or singular physical characteristic representing an established and familiar visual feature of the neighborhood.

Historic Context (from Council Agenda Report):
The Santa Barbara School District was founded on June 6, 1866, with the first public high school program commencing in 1875. The curriculum, which included algebra, ancient history, astronomy, English, and Latin, was one of the first high school programs in California. Classes were originally held on the second floor of the Lincoln Elementary School. In 1896, the students were moved over to the San Marcos Hotel, which was originally designed as a college building. The school district leased the building for $2,000.00 per year. Looking for a permanent home, a $60,000.00 bond issue was passed in 1901 with the proceeds being used to purchase land at the northeast corner of De La Vina and Anapamu. In 1902, when it opened to students, the new school building was described as "a magnificent structure of rough hewn sandstone" by the Chamber of Commerce. In 1922, a $450,000.00 bond issue to build a new high school building was approved to furnish the new building. Board of education president Frederick Forrest Peabody, a key player in the construction of the current fdacility, donated $100,000.00 to build the Stadium, which now carries his name. Dedication ceremonies for the opening of the new school were held on June 19, 1924, and class began of September second.

The new campus originally encompassed 25 acres, with additional acreage being added by the end of the 1920s for a total of 29 acres. The former De La Vina campus covered only one city block (about 4 1/2 acres).

On Monday, June 29, 1925, Santa Barbara was awakened by a devestating earthquake. The old High School building, now a Junior High, was severely damaged, while the new High School building suffered only minor damage, totaling around $20,000.00. Thankfully, neither school was in session at the time that the earthquake struck.

The Figueroa Street Ticket Booth at the intersection of Figueroa and Rinconada Road is a six-sided one-story stone building that is an integral part of the retaining wall system behind the stadium. The booth was added in 1934 to provide access to Peabody Stadium, which was completed a decade earlier in 1924. "Arrow Shirt" millionaire and Board of Education President, Frederick Forrest Peabody, donated one hundred thousand dollars to build a "state of the art" stadium for the community. The stands were constructed of concrete at a time when everyone else had wooden bleachers.

Built by stone masons Antonio Da Ros, Lorenzo Dall 'Armi, and Albert Arata, the ticket booth features ashlar-style stonework and a mission barrel tile roof. The stone came from the City quarry in Cold Springs. The quality of the stonework on the booth match that found on large estates of the Riviera, which overlooks the school campus.

The school building survived earthquakes, two world wars, the great depression, and substantial social change. However, it was threatened in the late 1960s when consideration was given to tearing down the main school building because it was feared that it would not be safe during an earthquake. At the urging of the Santa Barbara High School Alumni Association, and School Board member Bob Kallman, tests were conducted which concluded that the building could be preserved with some retrofit measures, which were completed in the early 1970s.

There are a significant number of students who's parents, and, in some cases, grandparents, attended Santa Barbara High School. In addition, the Santa Barbara High School Alumni Association, at 3,600 members strong, is one of the largest in the country.

Thumb 700 e anapamu

Download Department of Parks and Recreation Form